United States
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Team USA
The Stars and Stripes
The Yanks
The American Ladies
Association United States Soccer Federation
Confederation CONCACAF
(North America)
Head coach Jill Ellis
Asst coach Omid Namazi
Paul Rogers
Tony Gustavsson
Captain Christie Rampone
Most caps Kristine Lilly (352)
Top scorer Abby Wambach (177)
FIFA code USA
FIFA ranking 1 Steady
Highest FIFA ranking 1 (March 2013)
Lowest FIFA ranking 2 (October 2003)
First international
 Italy 1–0 United States 
(Jesolo, Italy; August 18, 1985)
Biggest win
 United States 14–0 Dominican Rep. 
(Vancouver, Canada; January 20, 2012)
Biggest defeat
 Brazil 4–0 United States 
(Hangzhou, China; September 27, 2007)
World Cup
Appearances 7 (First in 1991)
Best result Winners (1991, 1999)
CONCACAF Championship
& Gold Cup
Appearances 7 (First in 1991)
Best result Winners (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014)

The United States women's national football team, often referred to as USWNT, represents the United States of America in international soccer competitions. It is controlled by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF (the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football). The U.S. team won the first ever Women's World Cup in 1991, and has since been a superpower in women's soccer.[1] It is currently ranked first in the world by the FIFA Women's World Rankings.[2] The team has also won the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, four Olympic women's gold medals (1996,[3] 2004,[4] 2008[5] and 2012) and nine Algarve Cups (2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2013).

Among its many other honors, the team was selected as the U.S. Olympic Committee's Team of the Year in 1997 and 1999. Sports Illustrated chose the entire team as its 1999 Sportspeople of the Year.[6]

History

The team played its first match at the Mundialito tournament on August 12, 1985, coached by Mike Ryan (not related to 2005–2007 coach Greg Ryan). In March 2004, two of its stars, Mia Hamm (who retired later that year after a post-Olympic team tour of the USA) and Michelle Akers (who had already retired), were the only two women and the only two Americans named to the FIFA 100, a list of the 125 greatest living soccer players chosen by Pelé as part of FIFA's centenary observances. Those two women along with Julie Foudy, Kristine Lilly, and the 1999 team started a revolution towards women's team sports in America.

Arguably their most influential and memorable victory came in the 1999 World Cup when they beat China 5–4 in a penalty shootout.[7] With this win they emerged onto the world stage and brought significant media attention to women's soccer and athletics. On July 10, 1999, over 90,000 people (the largest ever for a women’s sporting event and one of the largest attendances in the world for a tournament game final) filled the Rose Bowl to watch the United States play China in the Final. After a back and forth game, the score was tied 0–0 at full-time, and remained so after extra time, leading to a penalty kick shootout. With Briana Scurry's save of China's third kick, the score was 4–4 with only Brandi Chastain left to shoot. She scored and won the game for the United States. Chastain famously dropped to her knees and whipped off her shirt, celebrating in her sports bra, which later made the cover of Sports Illustrated and the front pages of newspapers around the country and world.[8] This win influenced girls to want to play soccer on a team.[9][10]

Perhaps the second most influential victory came on July 10, 2011, in the quarterfinal of the 2011 Women's World Cup in Germany, where the U.S. beat Brazil 5–3 on penalty kicks. Abby Wambach tied the game 2–2 in the 2nd minute of extra time in the 2nd period of overtime (the 122nd minute of the match overall) with a header off a left-footed cross by Megan Rapinoe.[11] Earlier in the game, Brazil had evened the score 1–1 on a controversial penalty kick. Interestingly, the game was played on the 12th anniversary of the memorable 1999 World Cup Final (described above), which the US also won on penalty kicks.

In the [13] By scoring both goals in the 2012 Olympic final, Carli Lloyd is the only woman in history to score the winning goal in separate gold Olympic matches (2008 and 2012).

In late 2012 U.S. Soccer (along with the Canadian Soccer Association and Mexican Football Federation) announced it would subsidize formation of the new National Women's Soccer League starting in 2013,[14] following previous termination of the WUSA and WPS leagues. Stated benefits to the women's national team included providing "competitive games week in and week out against the other best players in the country as well as some international players,” and giving "opportunities to players who may not have the chance in the past to play for the national team or to players who have been on the fringes but haven’t been able to break into the squad."[15]

In the 2013 season, USA had an undefeated record of 14-0-2 with their last win against Brazil with a score of 4-1 as part of a longer 43-game unbeaten streak that spanned two years. The USA's 43-game unbeaten streak came to an end after a 1-0 loss against Sweden in the 2014 Algarve Cup. The streak began with a 4-0 win over Sweden in the 2012 Algarve Cup after a 1-0 loss against Japan. The USWNT's 80-game home unbeaten streak is still active.[16][17]

Past and present kits

Traditionally since the team started, the kit has been an all-white kit, with occasional blue shorts. Blue shorts in combination with blue or red jersey and socks have also been used. Combinations of red, white and blue were used in 2003 World Cup, and 2004 Olympics. From 2012, the team's kit is identical to that worn by the men's team. Like the men's team, Nike is the team's kit manufacturer. The team also wears two stars above the US Soccer badge, to signify their two championship titles from World Cup competitions.

Coaching staff

Head coach Jill Ellis
Assistant coach Omid Namazi
Goalkeeping coach Paul Rogers
Fitness Coach Dawn Scott

Recent schedule and results

The following is a list of matches from the past twelve months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

US Soccer Schedule. USA: Fixtures and Results – FIFA.com

Players

Current squad

Head coach Jill Ellis named 24 players to the U.S. Women’s National Team roster for the Torneio Internacional de Futebol Feminino that will take place from December 10 to December 21, 2014.[18]


Caps and goals are current as of October 26, 2014.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Hope Solo (1981-07-30) July 30, 1981 159 0 Seattle Reign FC
1GK Ashlyn Harris (1985-10-19) October 19, 1985 4 0 Washington Spirit
1GK Alyssa Naeher (1988-04-20) April 20, 1988 0 0 Boston Breakers
2DF Christie Rampone (captain) (1975-06-24) June 24, 1975 301 4 Sky Blue FC
2DF Becky Sauerbrunn (1985-06-06) June 6, 1985 67 0 FC Kansas City
2DF Ali Krieger (1984-07-28) July 28, 1984 53 1 Washington Spirit
2DF Kelley O'Hara (1988-08-04) August 4, 1988 49 0 Sky Blue FC
2DF Whitney Engen (1987-11-28) November 28, 1987 22 3 Western New York Flash
2DF Meghan Klingenberg (1988-08-02) August 2, 1988 21 1 Houston Dash
2DF Crystal Dunn (1992-07-03) July 3, 1992 12 0 Washington Spirit
2DF Julie Johnston (1992-04-06) April 6, 1992 4 0 Chicago Red Stars
3MF Heather O'Reilly (1985-01-02) January 2, 1985 212 41 Boston Breakers
3MF Carli Lloyd (1982-07-16) July 16, 1982 181 56 Houston Dash
3MF Lauren Holiday (1987-09-30) September 30, 1987 110 23 FC Kansas City
3MF Megan Rapinoe (1985-07-05) July 5, 1985 92 28 Seattle Reign FC
3MF Lori Chalupny (1984-01-29) January 29, 1984 92 8 Chicago Red Stars
3MF Tobin Heath (1988-05-29) May 29, 1988 81 11 Portland Thorns FC
3MF Morgan Brian (1993-02-26) February 26, 1993 16 3 Virginia
3MF Sam Mewis (1992-10-09) October 9, 1992 2 0 UCLA
4FW Abby Wambach (1980-06-02) June 2, 1980 228 177 Western New York Flash
4FW Amy Rodriguez (1987-02-17) February 17, 1987 113 28 FC Kansas City
4FW Alex Morgan (1989-07-02) July 2, 1989 77 49 Portland Thorns FC
4FW Sydney Leroux (1990-05-07) May 7, 1990 61 33 Seattle Reign FC
4FW Christen Press (1988-12-29) December 29, 1988 32 15 Chicago Red Stars

Recent call-ups

The following players were named to a squad in the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Nicole Barnhart (1981-10-10) October 10, 1981 54 0 FC Kansas City v. Mexico; September 18, 2014
GK Jillian LoydenRET (1985-06-25) June 25, 1985 10 0 Sky Blue FC v. Canada; May 8, 2014
DF Rachel Van Hollebeke (1985-08-26) August 26, 1985 112 5 Portland Thorns FC v. Mexico; September 18, 2014
DF Stephanie Cox (1986-04-03) April 3, 1986 89 0 Seattle Reign FC v. Mexico; September 18, 2014
DF Nikki Marshall (1988-06-02) June 2, 1988 0 0 Portland Thorns FC v. Canada; May 8, 2014
MF Shannon Boxx (1977-06-29) June 29, 1977 186 27 Chicago Red Stars v. Mexico; September 18, 2014
MF Kristie Mewis (1991-02-25) February 25, 1991 15 1 Boston Breakers v. Mexico; September 18, 2014
MF Allie Long (1987-08-13) August 13, 1987 4 0 Portland Thorns FC v. Mexico; September 18, 2014
MF Sarah Killion (1992-07-27) July 27, 1992 0 0 UCLA 2014 Algarve Cup; March 12, 2014
MF Erika Tymrak (1991-08-07) August 7, 1991 3 1 FC Kansas City v. Russia; February 13, 2014
FW Sarah Hagen (1989-11-18) November 18, 1989 2 0 FC Kansas City v. France; June 19, 2014
FW Katie Stengel (1992-02-29) February 29, 1992 0 0 Bayern Munich v. China PR; April 10, 2014

Notes:

  • RET = Retired from the national team

Records

Active players in bold, statistics as of October 26, 2014

The women's national team boasts the first six players in the history of the game to have earned 200 caps. These players have since been joined in the 200-cap club by Pu Wei and Li Jie of China, Birgit Prinz of Germany and Christine Sinclair of Canada, as well as by three more Americans, Kate Markgraf, Abby Wambach and Heather O'Reilly. Kristine Lilly and Christie Rampone are the only players to earn more than 300 caps.

10 most capped players

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Kristine Lilly 352 130 1987–2010
2 Christie Rampone 301 4 1997–
3 Mia Hamm 275 158 1987–2004
4 Julie Foudy 272 45 1987–2004
5 Joy Fawcett 239 27 1987–2004
6 Abby Wambach 228 177 2001–
7 Heather O'Reilly 212 41 2002–
8 Tiffeny Milbrett 204 100 1992–2006
9 Kate Markgraf 202 1 1998–2010
10 Brandi Chastain 192 30 1991–2004

Top 10 scorers

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Abby Wambach 228 177 2001–
2 Mia Hamm 275 158 1987–2004
3 Kristine Lilly 352 130 1987–2010
4 Michelle Akers 153 105 1985–2000
5 Tiffeny Milbrett 204 100 1992–2006
6 Cindy Parlow 158 75 1995–2006
7 Shannon MacMillan 176 60 1994–2006
8 Carli Lloyd 181 57 2005-
9 Carin Jennings-Gabarra 117 53 1987–1996
10 Alex Morgan 77 49 2010-

Top 10 assists

Rank Player Caps Assists Years
1 Mia Hamm 275 144 1987–2004
2 Kristine Lilly 352 105 1987–2010
3 Abby Wambach 228 68 2001-
4 Tiffeny Milbrett 204 61 1991–2005
5 Julie Foudy 272 55 1988–2004
6 Heather O'Reilly 212 51 2002–
7 Shannon MacMillan 176 50 1993–2005
8 Carin Jennings-Gabarra 117 47 1987-1996
9 Aly Wagner 131 42 1998–2008
10 Michelle Akers 153 36 1985-2000

Most goals scored in a match

The record for most goals scored in a match by a member of the USWNT is five, which has been accomplished by six players.

Player Date Opponent Location Competition Line-up Notes
Brandi Chastain April 18, 1991 Mexico Port-au-Prince, Haiti FIFA Women's World Cup Final Qualifying Tournament Substitute First 5 career international goals. Consecutive goals in the match. Final score: 12–0
Michelle Akers November 24, 1991 Chinese Taipei Foshan, China 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup Starting Included first 3 goals of the match (9', 29', 33'). The only American to score 5 goals in a World Cup or Olympics match. Final score: 7–0
Tiffeny Milbrett November 2, 2002 Panama Seattle, Washington, USA 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup Starting Included a hat trick in the first nine minutes. Final score: 9–0
Abby Wambach October 23, 2004 Republic of Ireland Houston, Texas, USA International Friendly.
Fan Celebration Tour
Starting Played indoor in Reliant Stadium. Four goals were assists from Mia Hamm. Final score: 5–0
Amy Rodriguez January 20, 2012 Dominican Republic Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 2012 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute
(46')
Biggest win by U.S. women's national team. Final score: 14–0
Sydney Leroux January 22, 2012 Guatemala Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 2012 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute
(46')
First 5 career international goals in her second cap for U.S. women's senior team. Final score: 13–0

Most shutouts

Rank Player Caps Shutouts Years
1 Hope Solo 159 76[19] 2000–
2 Brianna Scurry 173 71[20] 1994-2007

Head coaches

Name Years Matches Won Tied Lost Win % Pts÷M
Ryan, MikeMike Ryan 1985 4 0 1 3 .125 0.25
Dorrance, AnsonAnson Dorrance 1986–1994 93 66 5 22 .737 2.18
DiCicco, TonyTony DiCicco 1994–1999 119 103 8 8 .899 2.66
Gregg, LaurenLauren Gregg 1997, 2000 3 2 1 0 .833 2.33
Heinrichs, AprilApril Heinrichs 2000–2004 124 87 20 17 .782 2.27
Ryan, GregGreg Ryan 2005–2007 55 45 9 1 .900 2.62
Sundhage, PiaPia Sundhage 2007–2012 107 91 10 6 .897 2.64
Sermanni, TomTom Sermanni 2013–2014 23 17 4 2 .826 2.39
Ellis, JillianJillian Ellis 2012, 2014–Present 19 15 4 0 .895 2.58
Totals 547 426 62 59 .835 2.45
Statistics as of October 27, 2014

Statistics

World Cup

Host year in red
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
1991 Champions 6 6 0 0 25 5 Anson Dorrance
1995 Third place 6 4 1 1 15 5 Tony DiCicco
1999 Champions 6 5 1 0 18 3 Tony DiCicco
2003 Third place 6 5 0 1 15 5 April Heinrichs
2007 Third place 6 4 1 1 12 7 Greg Ryan
2011 Runners-up 6 3 2 1 13 7 Pia Sundhage
2015 Qualified
Total 7/7 36 27 5 4 98 32

Olympic Games

The team has participated in every Olympics tournament through 2012 and won a medal in each.
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
1996 Champions 5 4 1 0 9 3 Tony DiCicco
2000 Runners-up 6 4 1 1 9 5 April Heinrichs
2004 Champions 6 5 1 0 12 4 April Heinrichs
2008 Champions 6 5 0 1 12 5 Pia Sundhage
2012 Champions 6 6 0 0 16 6 Pia Sundhage
2016 To Be Determined
2020 To Be Determined
Total 5/5 29 24 3 2 58 23

CONCACAF Championship and Gold Cup

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
1991 Champions 5 5 0 0 49 0 Anson Dorrance
1993 Champions 3 3 0 0 13 0 Anson Dorrance
1994 Champions 4 4 0 0 16 1 Tony DiCicco
1998
Did not participate1
2000 Champions 5 4 1 0 24 1 April Heinrichs
2002 Champions 5 5 0 0 24 1 April Heinrichs
2006 Champions 2 2 0 0 4 1 Greg Ryan
2010 Third place 5 4 0 1 22 2 Pia Sundhage
2014 Champions 5 5 0 0 21 0 Jill Ellis
Total 8/9 34 32 1 1 173 6

1 The US team directly qualified for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup as hosts of the event. Because of this, they did not participate in the 1998 CONCACAF Championship, which was the qualification tournament for the World Cup.

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's association football hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events,[21] alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
1994 2Runners-Up 3 2 0 1 6 1 Toni DiCicco
1995 4th Place 4 2 1 1 8 5 Toni DiCicco
1996 -1did not enter -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1
1997 -1did not enter -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1
1998 3Third Place 4 3 0 1 10 6 Toni DiCicco
1999 2Runners-Up 4 2 1 1 8 4 Toni DiCicco
2000 1Champions 4 4 0 0 11 1 April Heinrichs
2001 6th Place 4 1 0 3 5 9 April Heinrichs
2002 5th Place 4 2 1 1 8 6 April Heinrichs
2003 1Champions 4 2 2 0 5 2 April Heinrichs
2004 1Champions 4 3 0 1 11 5 April Heinrichs
2005 1Champions 4 4 0 0 9 0 Greg Ryan
2006 2Runners-Up 4 2 2 0 9 1 Greg Ryan
2007 1Champions 4 4 0 0 8 3 Greg Ryan
2008 1Champions 4 4 0 0 12 1 Pia Sundhage
2009 2Runners-Up 4 3 1 0 5 1 Pia Sundhage
2010 1Champions 4 4 0 0 9 3 Pia Sundhage
2011 1Champions 4 4 0 0 12 3 Pia Sundhage
2012 3Third Place 4 3 0 1 11 2 Pia Sundhage
2013 1Champions 4 3 1 0 11 1 Tom Sermanni
2014 7th Place 4 1 1 2 7 7 Tom Sermanni
Total[22] 19/21 75 53 10 12 165 61

Pan American Games

The Pan American Games are held in the same year as the FIFA Women's World Cup, consequently the senior United States women's national soccer team never participated in the Pan American Games. However two youth teams: an under-18 team participated and won the inaugural women's soccer tournament at the 1999 Pan American Games,[23] and an under-20 team lost in the final to a full Brazil team in the 2007 Pan American Games.[24] Some of the players who participated in those Pan American Games, such as Hope Solo, Tobin Heath, Lauren Cheney, Cat Reddick and Kelley O'Hara, later played for the full national team.

Torneio Internacional de Futebol Feminino

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA COACH
2014 To Be Determined - - - - - - Jill Ellis
Total 0/0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Yearly Team Summary

Year M W D L Athlete of the Year Scoring leader G Assist leader A Coach Major tournam. result
1985 4 0 1 3 Sharon Remer Michelle Akers 2 Mike Ryan
1986 6 4 0 2 April Heinrichs Marcia McDermott 4 Anson Dorrance
1987 11 6 1 4 Carin Gabarra April Heinrichs 7 Anson Dorrance
1988 8 3 2 3 Joy Fawcett Carin Gabarra 5 C. Gabarra, K. Lilly 2 Anson Dorrance
1989 1 0 1 0 April Heinrichs (none) (none) Anson Dorrance
1990 6 6 0 0 Michelle Akers Michelle Akers 9 Kristine Lilly 3 Anson Dorrance
1991 28 21 1 6 Michelle Akers Michelle Akers 39 Carin Gabarra 21 Anson Dorrance World Cup (Champions)
1992 2 0 0 2 Carin Gabarra (3 players tied) 1 Tisha Venturini 2 Anson Dorrance
1993 17 13 0 4 Kristine Lilly Mia Hamm 10 Michelle Akers 6 Anson Dorrance
1994 13 12 0 1 Mia Hamm Michelle Akers 11 Michelle Akers 7 Anson Dorrance
1995 23 19 2 2 Mia Hamm Mia Hamm 19 Mia Hamm 18 Tony DiCicco World Cup (3rd place)
1996 24 21 2 1 Mia Hamm Tiffeny Milbrett 13 Mia Hamm 18 Tony DiCicco Olympics (Gold medal)
1997 18 16 0 2 Mia Hamm Mia Hamm 18 Tiffeny Milbrett 14 Tony DiCicco
1998 25 22 2 1 Mia Hamm Mia Hamm 20 Mia Hamm 20 Tony DiCicco
1999 29 25 2 2 Michelle Akers Tiffeny Milbrett 21 Mia Hamm 16 Tony DiCicco World Cup (Champions)
2000 41 26 9 6 Tiffeny Milbrett Cindy Parlow 19 Mia Hamm 14 L. Gregg, A. Heinrichs Olympics (Silver medal)
2001 10 3 2 5 Tiffeny Milbrett Tiffeny Milbrett 3 Mia Hamm 2 April Heinrichs
2002 19 15 2 2 Shannon MacMillan Shannon MacMillan 17 Aly Wagner 11 April Heinrichs
2003 23 17 4 2 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 9 Mia Hamm 9 April Heinrichs World Cup (3rd place)
2004 34 28 4 2 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 31 Mia Hamm 22 April Heinrichs Olympics (Gold medal)
2005 9 8 1 0 Kristine Lilly Christie Welsh 7 A. Wagner, A. Wambach 5 Greg Ryan
2006 22 18 4 0 Kristine Lilly Abby Wambach 17 Abby Wambach 8 Greg Ryan
2007 24 19 4 1 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 20 Kristine Lilly 8 Greg Ryan World Cup (3rd place)
2008 36 33 2 1 Carli Lloyd Natasha Kai 15 H. O'Reilly, A. Wambach 10 Pia Sundhage Olympics (Gold medal)
2009 8 7 1 0 Hope Solo (3 players tied) 2 Heather O'Reilly 3 Pia Sundhage
2010 18 15 2 1 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 16 Lori Lindsey 7 Pia Sundhage
2011 20 13 4 3 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 8 L. Holiday, M. Rapinoe 5 Pia Sundhage World Cup (2nd place)
2012 32 28 3 1 Alex Morgan Alex Morgan 28 Alex Morgan 21 P. Sundhage, J. Ellis Olympics (Gold medal)
2013 16 13 3 0 Abby Wambach Abby Wambach 11 L. Holiday, A. Wambach 6 Tom Sermanni
2014 20 14 3 2 Lauren Holiday Abby Wambach 14 Carli Lloyd 8 T. Sermanni, J. Ellis

Updated through 2014-12-07[25][26]

Honors

Media coverage

ESPN and ESPN2 bring most coverage, with occasional coverage from Fox Soccer, Fox Sports en Espanol, and Galavisión.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Combating a myth from Women's World Cup '91".  
  2. ^ "FIFA World Ranking for USA Women". FIFA. 
  3. ^ "U.S. Women's Soccer Team Wins Gold". WashingtonPost.com. 1996-08-02. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  4. ^ "SI.com – Wambach gives U.S. veterans golden parting gift in extra time – Thursday August 26, 2004 7:26PM". Sportsillustrated.cnn.com. 2004-08-26. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  5. ^ Homewood, Brian (2008-08-22). "U.S. retain gold against Brazil in women's soccer | Reuters". In.reuters.com. Retrieved 2012-09-15. 
  6. ^ Michael Bamberger (1999-12-20). "Michelle Akers and the 19 other members of the World – 12.20.99 – SI Vault". Sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Retrieved 2012-08-20. 
  7. ^ "SOCCER; 1999 Women's World Cup: Beautiful Game Takes Flight". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2012-08-03. 
  8. ^ Author: sigroup (2012-05-04). "Brandi Chastain « Inside Sports Illustrated". Insidesportsillustrated.com. Retrieved 2012-08-20. 
  9. ^ Giving girls the opportunity to play soccer or any team sport.
  10. ^ Dare to Dream. Ouisie Shapiro. HBO Productions, 19 September 2007. Video
  11. ^ "Big TV Rating for U.S. Win".  
  12. ^ "U.S. tops Japan for soccer gold". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  13. ^ a b c "U.S. Women's National Team Squares Off Against Australia on Wednesday in Fan Tribute Tour". USSoccer.com. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  14. ^ Lauletta, Dan (2012-11-21). "Eight teams to start new women’s pro soccer league in 2013". The Equalizer. Retrieved 2014-11-03. 
  15. ^ Bell, Jack (2013-04-13). "Another Attempt at Women’s Circuit, but With a Twist". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-11-03. 
  16. ^ "Streak’s snapped, but US must regroup in Algarve". Equalizer soccer. Retrieved 2014-03-10. 
  17. ^ "Newspaper reminder of magnitude of Sweden’s win". Equalizer soccer. Retrieved 2014-03-10. 
  18. ^ "Ellis Names WNT Roster for International Tournament of Brasilia". 
  19. ^ "U.S. WNT Routs Mexico 8-0 as Hope Solo Earns Record 72nd Clean Sheet". United States Soccer Federation. September 13, 2014. Retrieved 16 September 2014. 
  20. ^ "U.S. Women's National Team Records". United States Soccer Federation. Retrieved 16 September 2014. 
  21. ^ Reynolds, Mike (8 March 2013). "In Demand Serves Up Algarve Cup Action".  
  22. ^ "Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation". 
  23. ^ "U.S. Under-18 Women Defeat Mexico 1-0, Take Home Inaugural Pan Am Championship". U.S.Soccer. Aug 5, 1999. Retrieved Aug 28, 2014. 
  24. ^ "U-20 WNT Fall in Pan-Am Final to Full Brazilian National Team". U.S.Soccer. Jul 26, 2007. Retrieved Aug 28, 2014. 
  25. ^ "U.S. SOCCER FEDERATION 2014 WOMEN’S NATIONAL TEAM MEDIA GUIDE (PDF)". U.S. Soccer. 2014-01-01. Retrieved 2014-09-14. 
  26. ^ "U.S. Women's National Team Stats page". U.S. Soccer. Retrieved 2014-08-28. 
  27. ^ US Cup (Women) rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  28. ^ Four Nations Tournament (Women - Held in China) rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  29. ^ 2006 Peace Queen Cup rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  30. ^ 2008 Peace Queen Cup rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  31. ^ DFB Centenary Tournament 2000 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  32. ^ Pacific Cup (Women) 2000 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  33. ^ Brazil Cup 1996 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  34. ^ North America Cup 1987 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  35. ^ North America Cup 1990 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  36. ^ Canada Cup 1990 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  37. ^ Australia Cup 1999-2004 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  38. ^ Tournoi International Feminin 1995 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  39. ^ Chiquita Cup 1994 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  40. ^ Tri-Nations Tournament 1994 (Trinidad) rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  41. ^ Goodwill Games 1998 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  42. ^ Colombus Cup 1993 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  43. ^ Women's World Invitational Tournament (Chughua Cup)1978-1987 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.
  44. ^ Mundialito (Women) 1982-1988 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12-10-2013.

External links

  • Official website
  • NWSL website
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural champions
FIFA Women's World Cup champions
1991 (first title)
Succeeded by
1995 Norway 
Preceded by
1995 Norway 
FIFA Women's World Cup champions
1999 (second title)
Succeeded by
2003 Germany 
Preceded by
Inaugural champions
Olympic champions
1996 (first title)
Succeeded by
2000 Norway 
Preceded by
2000 Norway 
Olympic champions
2004 (second title)
2008 (third title)
2012 (fourth title)
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Inaugural champions
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions
1991 (first title)
1993 (second title)
1994 (third title)
Succeeded by
1998 Canada 
Preceded by
1998 Canada 
As CONCACAF champions
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions
2000 (fourth title)
2002 (fifth title)
2006 (sixth title)
Succeeded by
2010 Canada