Refugio, Texas

Refugio, Texas

Refugio, Texas
City
Refugio City Hall
Refugio City Hall
Location of Refugio, Texas
Location of Refugio, Texas
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Texas
County Refugio
Area
 • Total 1.6 sq mi (4.1 km2)
 • Land 1.6 sq mi (4.1 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 46 ft (14 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 2,941
 • Density 1,880.7/sq mi (726.1/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 78377
Area code(s) 361
FIPS code 48-61436[1]
GNIS feature ID 1345013[2]

Refugio ( ) is a town in Refugio County, Texas, United States. The population was 2,941 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Refugio County.[3]

Contents

  • Geography 1
    • Climate 1.1
  • Demographics 2
  • History 3
  • Notable people 4
  • Education 5
  • References 6

Geography

Refugio is located at (28.305812, -97.274594).[4] According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.0 km²), all land.

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Refugio has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[5]

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 2,941 people, 1,128 households, and 788 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,880.7 people per square mile (727.9/km²). There were 1,312 housing units at an average density of 839.0 per square mile (324.7/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 74.53% White, 13.40% African American, 0.51% Native American, 0.51% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 9.38% from other races, and 1.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 44.30% of the population.

There were 1,128 households out of which 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 18.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the town the population was 26.7% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 90.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males. The median income for a household in the town was $26,719, and the median income for a family was $32,237. Males had a median income of $33,021 versus $15,549 for females. The per capita income for the town was $13,523. About 16.8% of families and 21.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 20.9% of those age 65 or over.

History

Refugio, the county seat of Refugio County, is on the north bank of the

In 1871, when Aransas County was separated from part of Refugio County, the government of Refugio County returned to Refugio. The town's council was reorganized in 1874, and Refugio began to revive as it became a marketing and shipping center for the hides, wool, cotton, and livestock produced in the area. By 1884 the town had grown to a population of about 1,000 and included a wooden courthouse, three churches, and a public school. Though the population of the surrounding county declined during the 1880s, Refugio continued to grow during this period, and by 1890 there were an estimated 1,100 people living there. That year the town had Catholic and Baptist churches, a convent, a parochial school, two public schools (one for white students, one for blacks), and two hotels. Without a railroad Refugio had difficulty competing with other towns in the region, however, and shrank during the 1890s; its estimated population dropped to 800 by 1892 and to 600 by 1896; in 1900 there were 699 people living there. About 1902 the St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway began making surveys of the area, and fearing that the railroad would bypass their town unless paid a $30,000 "bonus," leading citizens organized to raise the money. Ultimately, the town paid the railroad $18,000 in cash and half of the town's common lands for a railroad connection, and by December 1905 the tracks had been laid and a depot built about a mile from the city. A description of the town in 1905 mentioned the convent, a hotel, two saloons, a blacksmith shop, about five stores, the wooden county courthouse, and a "handful" of dwellings.

A major part of its history is found in the hardships of a local stream called the Monkey Slough. In the older days, many locals had very little sources of water, therefore the Monkey Slough was their only source. Many people would meet to take the water they needed to survive but the amount was so scarce. Eventually the locals began to get mad at each other and violence began. Many ended up splitting and moved North in search of better living conditions. As well as the split, many of them died and mourned because of it.

Notable people

Education

The Town of Refugio is served by the Refugio Independent School District.

References

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  5. ^ Climate Summary for Refugio, Texas
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.