Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

ries on the Gallic War Book 8
  • ^ "Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans, by Plutarch (chapter48)". 
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius 28
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 32.8
  • ^ Thomson, D. F. S.; Sperna Weiland, Jan (1988). "Erasmus and textual scholarship: Suetonius". In Weiland, J. S. Erasmus of Rotterdam: the man and the scholar. Leiden, Netherlands: E.J. Brill. p. 161.  
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 35.2
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 42–45
  • ^ a b Plutarch, Caesar 37.2
  • ^ a b Martin Jehne, Der Staat des Dicators Caesar, Köln/Wien 1987, p. 15-38.
  • ^ Plutarch, Pompey 80.5
  • ^ Plutarch, Pompey 77–79
  • ^ a b Salisbury, Joyce E (2001). "Cleopatra VII". Women in the ancient world. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. p. 52.  
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius 35.2
  • ^ Caesar: a history of the art of war among the Romans down to the end of the Roman empire, with a detailed account of the campaigns of Caius Julius Caesar, page 791, Theodore Ayrault Dodge, Greenhill Books, 1995. ISBN 9781853672163
  • ^ Paul: The Man and the Myth, page 15, Studies on personalities of the New Testament Personalities of the New Testament Series, Calvin J. Roetzel, Continuum International Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN 9780567086983
  • ^ Julius Caesar, page 311, Philip Freeman, Simon and Schuster, 2008. ISBN 9780743289535
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 52–54
  • ^ Martin Jehne, Der Staat des Dicators Caesar, Köln/Wien 1987, p. 15-38. Technically, Caesar was not appointed Dictator with a term of ten years but he was appointed annual dictator for the next ten years in advance.
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 56
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 56.7–56.8
  • ^ Appian, The Civil Wars 2:143.1
  • ^ a b c Abbott, 133
  • ^ a b c Abbott, 134
  • ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History 43.19.2–3; Appian, Civil Wars 2.101.420
  • ^ a b c d e f g h i J.F.C. Fuller, Julius Caesar, Man, Soldier, Tyrant", Chapter 13
  • ^ Diana E. E. Kleiner. Julius Caesar, Venus Genetrix, and the Forum Iulium (Multimedia presentation). Yale University. 
  • ^ Mackay, Christopher S. (2004). Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History. Cambridge University Press. p. 254. 
  • ^ Campbell, J. B. (1994). The Roman Army, 31 BC–AD 337. Routledge. p. 10. 
  • ^ a b Suetonius, Julius 40
  • ^ a b c d e f g Abbott, 136
  • ^ a b c d e Abbott, 137
  • ^ a b c d e Abbott, 135
  • ^ Abbott, 138
  • ^ Huzar, Eleanor Goltz (1978). Mark Antony, a biography By Eleanor Goltz Huzar. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press. pp. 79–80.  
  • ^ "Plutarch – Life of Brutus". Classics.mit.edu. Retrieved 28 April 2010. 
  • ^ "Suetonius, ',Life of the Caesars, Julius', trans. J C Rolfe". Fordham.edu. Retrieved 28 April 2010. 
  • ^ Plutarch, Life of Caesar, ch. 66: "ὁ μεν πληγείς, Ῥωμαιστί· 'Μιαρώτατε Κάσκα, τί ποιεῖς;'"
  • ^ Woolf Greg (2006), Et Tu Brute? – The Murder of Caesar and Political Assassination, 199 pages – ISBN 1-86197-741-7
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius, c. 82.
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius 82.2
  • ^ From the J. C. Rolfe translation of 1914: "...he was stabbed with three and twenty wounds, uttering not a word, but merely a groan at the first stroke, though some have written that when Marcus Brutus rushed at him, he said in Greek, 'You too, my child?".
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 66.9
  • ^ Stone, Jon R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations. London: Routledge. p. 250.  
  • ^ Morwood, James (1994). The Pocket Oxford Latin Dictionary (Latin-English). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.  
  • ^ It appears, for example, in Richard Edes's Latin play Caesar Interfectus of 1582 and The True Tragedie of Richarde Duke of Yorke &tc of 1595, Shakespeare's source work for other plays.
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 67
  • ^ "Temple of Caesar". Anamericaninrome.com. Retrieved 8 January 2012. 
  • ^ "Temple of Caesar". Findagrave.com. Retrieved 8 January 2012. 
  • ^ Florus, Epitome 2.7.1
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius 83.2
  • ^ "Suetonius, Life of Caesar, Chapters LXXXIII, LXXXIV, LXXXV". Ancienthistory.about.com. 29 October 2009. Retrieved 28 April 2010. 
  • ^ Osgood, Josiah (2006). Caesar's Legacy: Civil War and the Emergence of the Roman Empire. Cambridge University Press. p. 60. 
  • ^ Suetonius, Augustus 13.1; Florus, Epitome 2.6
  • ^ Warrior, Valerie M. (2006). Roman Religion. Cambridge University Press. p. 110.  
  • ^ Florus, Epitome 2.6.3
  • ^ Zoch, Paul A. (200). Ancient Rome: An Introductory History. University of Oklahoma Press. pp. 217–218.  
  • ^ Florus, Epitome 2.7.11–14; Appian, The Civil Wars 5.3
  • ^ Florus, Epitome 2.34.66
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 58.6
  • ^ Cicero, Phillipic ii.110: Cicero refers to the divine honours of : "...couch, image, pediment, priest" given to Caesar in the months before his assassination.
  • ^ According to Dio Cassius, 44.6.4.
  • ^ Plutarch, Caesar 17, 45, 60; see also Suetonius, Julius 45.
  • ^ Ronald T. Ridley, "The Dictator's Mistake: Caesar's Escape from Sulla," Historia 49 (2000), pp. 225–226, citing doubters of epilepsy: F. Kanngiesser, "Notes on the Pathology of the Julian Dynasty," Glasgow Medical Journal 77 (1912) 428–432; T. Cawthorne, "Julius Caesar and the Falling Sickness,” Proceedings of Royal Society of Medicine 51 (1957) 27–30, who prefers Ménière's disease; and O. Temkin, The Falling Sickness: A History of Epilepsy from the Greeks to the Beginnings of Modern Neurology (Baltimore 1971), p 162.
  • ^ Seymour Diamond and Mary Franklin, Conquering Your Migraine: The Essential Guide to Understanding and Treating Migraines for all Sufferers and Their Families, (New York: Fireside, 2001), 19.
  • ^ Bruschi, Fabrizio (2011). "Was Julius Caesar's epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis?". Trends in Parasitology (Cell Press) 27 (9): 373–374.  
  • ^ McLachlan, Richard S. (2010). "Julius Caesar's Late Onset Epilepsy: A Case of Historic Proportions". Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences (Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences Inc.) 37 (5): 557–561. Retrieved 11 May 2013. 
  • ^ Hughes J; Atanassova, E; Boev, K (2004). "Dictator Perpetuus: Julius Caesar—did he have seizures? If so, what was the etiology?". Epilepsy Behav 5 (5): 756–64.  
  • ^ Gomez J, Kotler J, Long J (1995). "Was Julius Caesar's epilepsy due to a brain tumor?". The Journal of the Florida Medical Association 82 (3): 199–201.  
  • ^ H. Schneble (1 January 2003). "Gaius Julius Caesar". German Epilepsy Museum. Retrieved 28 August 2008. 
  • ^ Hodder, Harbour Fraser (September 2003). "Epilepsy and Empire, Caveat Caesar". Accredited Psychiatry & Medicine (Harvard, Boston: Harvard University) 106 (1): 19. 
  • ^ William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar I.ii.209.
  • ^ Plutarch, Alexander 42; Jeremy Paterson discussing Caesar's health in general in "Caesar the Man," A Companion to Julius Caesar (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), p. 130 online.
  • ^ Suetonius, Life of Caesar 45: excelsa statura, colore candido, teretibus membris, ore paulo pleniore, nigris vegetisque oculis.
  • ^ Plutarch, Brutus 5
  • ^ Tacitus, Histories 4.55
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius 49
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius 49; Cassius Dio, Roman History 43.20
  • ^ Catullus, Carmina 29, 57
  • ^ Suetonius, Julius 73
  • ^ Suetonius, Augustus 68, 71
  • ^ Cicero, Brutus, 252.
  • ^ Edward Courtney, The Fragmentary Latin Poets (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), pp. 153–155 and 187–188. See also Poems by Julius Caesar.
  • ^ T.P. Wiseman, “The Publication of De Bello Gallico,” Julius Caesar as Artful Reporter (Classical Press of Wales, 1998).